Hard working

The result of clearing the beds for the beans and pumpkin. Parsley, chard and parsnips.
And more!
The poles for the beans are all set up. In between we planted pumpkins.
More poles
A blackbird. We suspect these are building their nest in the hedge. They tweet and eat and get small pieces of straw out of the garden. Lovely.
Almonds
I couldn't resist making photos of the blackbirds each time i saw them
Dandelion seedheads
Calendula
Calendula
Buttercups
The female blackbird
Published on May 14, 2018 at 6:00 by

Modernity

Modernity, a topic in the humanities and social sciences, is both a historical period (the modern era), as well as the ensemble of particular socio-cultural norms, attitudes and practices that arose in the wake of Renaissance, in the “Age of Reason” of 17th-century thought and the 18th-century “Enlightenment”.

While it includes a wide range of interrelated historical processes and cultural phenomena (from fashion to modern warfare), it can also refer to the subjective or existential experience of the conditions they produce, and their ongoing impact on human culture, institutions, and politics (Berman 2010, 15–36).

Depending on the field, “modernity” may refer to different time periods or qualities. In historiography, the 17th to 18th century are usually described as early modern, while the long 19th century corresponds to “modern history” proper.

As an analytical concept and normative ideal, modernity is closely linked to the ethos of philosophical and aesthetic modernism; political and intellectual currents that intersect with the Enlightenment; and subsequent developments such as existentialism, modern art, the formal establishment of social science, and contemporaneous antithetical developments such as Marxism. It also encompasses the social relations associated with the rise of capitalism, and shifts in attitudes associated with secularisation and post-industrial life (Berman 2010, 15–36).

In the view of Michel Foucault (1975) (classified as a proponent of postmodernism though he himself rejected the “postmodernism” label, considering his work as a “a critical history of modernity”—see, e.g., Call 2002, 65), “modernity” as a historical category is marked by developments such as a questioning or rejection of tradition; the prioritization of individualism, freedom and formal equality; faith in inevitable social, scientific and technological progress, rationalization and professionalization, a movement from feudalism (or agrarianism) toward capitalism and the market economy, industrialization, urbanization and secularization, the development of the nation-state, representative democracy, public education (etc) (Foucault 1977, 170–77).

Modernity has been associated with cultural and intellectual movements of 1436–1789 and extending to the 1970s or later (Toulmin 1992, 3–5).

According to Marshall Berman (1982, 16–17), modernity is periodized into three conventional phases (dubbed “Early,” “Classical,” and “Late,” respectively, by Peter Osborne (1992, 25)):

  • Early modernity: 1500–1789 (or 1453–1789 in traditional historiography)
  • Classical modernity: 1789–1900 (corresponding to the long 19th century (1789–1914) in Hobsbawm’s scheme)
  • Late modernity: 1900–1989

In the second phase Berman draws upon the growth of modern technologies such as the newspaper, telegraph and other forms of mass media. There was a great shift into modernization in the name of industrial capitalism. Finally in the third phase, modernist arts and individual creativity marked the beginning of a new modernist age as it combats oppressive politics, economics as well as other social forces including mass media.

If the practice of labour shapes capitalism’s ecology, its indispensable machine is the mechanical clock. The clock – not money – emerged as the key technology for measuring the value of work. This distinction is crucial because it’s easy to think that working for wages is capitalism’s signature. It’s not: in 13th-century England only a third of the economically active population depended on wages for survival. That wages have become a decisive way of structuring life, space and nature owes everything to a new model of time.

By the early 14th century, the new temporal model was shaping industrial activity. In textile-manufacturing towns like Ypres, in what is now Belgium, workers found themselves regulated not by the flow of activity or the seasons but by a new kind of time – abstract, linear, repetitive. In Ypres, that work time was measured by the town’s bells, which rang at the beginning and end of each work shift. By the 16th century, time was measured in steady ticks of minutes and seconds. This abstract time came to shape everything – work and play, sleep and waking, credit and money, agriculture and industry, even prayer. By the end of the 16th century, most of England’s parishes had mechanical clocks.

Spain’s conquest of the Americas involved inculcating in their residents a new notion of time as well as of space. Wherever European empires penetrated, there appeared the image of the “lazy” native, ignorant of the imperatives of Christ and the clock. Policing time was central to capitalism’s ecology. As early as 1553, the Spanish crown began installing “at least one public clock” in its major colonial cities. Other civilisations had their own sophisticated temporal rules, but the new regimes of work displaced indigenous tempos and relationships with the natural world. The Mayan calendar is a complex hierarchy of times and readings from the heavens, offering a rich set of arrangements of humans within the universe. Spanish invaders respected it only to this extent: they synchronised their colonial assaults to sacred moments in the calendar.

As social historian EP Thompson observes in his seminal study Time, Work-Discipline and Industrial Capitalism, the governance of time follows a particular logic: “In mature capitalist society all time must be consumed, marketed, put to use; it is offensive for the labour force merely to ‘pass the time’.” The connection of specific activities to larger productive goals didn’t allow for time theft, and the discipline of the clock was enforced by violence across the planet.

Source: How the chicken nugget became the true symbol of our era

Published on May 10, 2018 at 6:00 by

Mijn vlakke land

Mijn Vlakke Land
Wanneer de Noordzee koppig breekt aan hoge duinen
En witte vlokken schuim uiteenslaan op de kruinen
Wanneer de norse vloed beukt aan het zwart basalt
En over dijk en duin de grijze nevel valt
Wanneer bij eb het strand woest is als een woestijn
En natte westenwinden gieren van venijn
Dan vecht mijn land, mijn vlakke land

Wanneer de regen daalt op straten, pleinen, perken
Op dak en torenspits van hemelhoge kerken
Die in dit vlakke land de enige bergen zijn
Wanneer onder de wolken mensen dwergen zijn
Wanneer de dagen gaan in domme regelmaat
En bolle oostenwind het land nog vlakker slaat
Dan wacht mijn land, mijn vlakke land

Wanneer de lage lucht vlak over ‘t water scheert
Wanneer de lage lucht ons nederigheid leert
Wanneer de lage lucht er grijs als leisteen is
Wanneer de lage lucht er vaal als keileem is
Wanneer de noordenwind de vlakte vierendeelt
Wanneer de noordenwind er onze adem steelt
Dan kraakt mijn land, mijn vlakke land

Wanneer de Schelde blinkt in zuidelijke zon
En elke Vlaamse vrouw flaneert in zon-japon
Wanneer de eerste spin zijn lentewebben weeft
Of dampende het veld in juli-zonlicht beeft
Wanneer de zuidenwind er schatert door het graan
Wanneer de zuidenwind er jubelt langs de baan
Dan juicht mijn land, mijn vlakke land

De Nuttelozen Van De Nacht
Ze ontwaken om een uur om vier
Ze ontbijten met een kleintje bier
Ze gaan uit omdat er thuis niets wacht
De nuttelozen van de nacht
Zij gedraagt zich arrogant omdat ze mooie borsten heeft
Hij is zeker en charmant omdat Papa hem centen geeft
Hun onmacht is hun hoogste macht
De nuttelozen van de nacht

Kom, dans met mij
Vriendin, kom hier, vriendin
Kom hier, kom hier
Nee, nee blijf!
Kom dans met mij
Laat ons dansen, lijf aan lijf

Ze braken zonder ziek te zijn
Ze braken zacht en zonder pijn
Ze nemen zich bedroefd de nacht
De nuttelozen van de nacht
Ze bespreken zonder end
De poëzie die geen van hen kent
De romans die geen van hen schreef
De vrouw die bij geen van hen bleef
De grap waarom geen van hen om lacht
De nuttelozen van de nacht

Kom, dans met mij
Vriendin, kom hier, vriendin
Kom hier, kom her
Nee, nee blijf!
Kom, dans met mij
Laat ons dansen, lijf aan lijf

In de liefde zijn ze zo berooid
’t Was, ’t was, ze was zo zacht
Ze was, ach, dat begrijp u nooit
De nuttelozen van de nacht
Ze nemen nog een laatste glas
Vertellen nog een laatste grap
En met een allerlaatste glas
De laatste dans
De laatste stap
Het laatste verdriet
De laatste klacht
De nuttelozen van de nacht

Kom, kom, kom huil met mij
Vriendin, kom hier, vriendin
Kom hier, kom hier
Nee blijf!
Kom, kom huil met mij
Laat ons huilen, lijf aan lijf
De nuttelozen …
Van de nacht …

Marieke
Ay Marieke, Marieke
Ik hield van jou
Tussen de torens
Van Brugge en Gent
Ay Marieke, Marieke
De tijd gaat gauw
Tussen de torens
Van Brugge en Gent

Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Waait de wind, de stomme wind
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Weent de zee, de grijze zee
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Lijdt het licht, het donker licht
En schuurt het zand over mijn land
Mijn platte land, mijn Vlaanderenland

Ay Marieke, Marieke
De Vlaamse lucht
Grijs als de torens
Van Brugge en Gent
Ay Marieke, Marieke
De Vlaamse lucht
Zij weent met mij
Van Brugge tot Gent

Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Waait de wind, de stomme wind
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Weent de zee, de grijze zee
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Lijdt het licht, het donker licht
En schuurt het zand over mijn land
Mijn platte land, mijn Vlaanderenland

Ay Marieke, Marieke
De Vlaamse lucht
Woog zij te zwar
Van Brugge tot Gent
Ay Marieke, Marieke
Op onze jeugd
Van Brugge tot Gent

Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Lach de duivel, de zwarte duivel
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Brandt mijn hart, mijn oude hart
Zonder liefde, warme liefde
Sterft de zomer, de droeve zomer
En schuurt het zand over mijn land
Mijn platte land, mijn Vlaanderenland

Ay Marieke, Marieke
Breng terug die tijd
Die mooie tijd
Van Brugge en Gent
Ay Marieke, Marieke
Breng terug die tijd
Van onze liefde
In Brugge en Gent

Ay Marieke, Marieke
Als d’avond spreidt
Dan lokken mij
Van Brugge tot Gent
Ay Marieke, Marieke
Met armen weijd
De diepe vijvers
Van Brugge en Gent
Van Brugge en Gent
Van Brugge en Gent
Van Brugge en Gent

Rosa
Rosa rosa rosam
Rosae rosae rosa
Rosae rosae rosas
Rosarum rosis rosis

Tango uit een grijs verleden
Die de schooljeugd van het heden
Op moet dreunen als gebeden
Bij het leren van Latijn

Tango van de lyceïsten
Die hun jeugd eraan verkwisten
En die dokteren aan listen
Om te ontkomen aan die pijn

Tango die de strenge ouders
Laden op de smalle schouders
Van hun Keesjes die de houders
Van het roer der toekomst zijn!

Rosa, rosa, rosam
Rosae, rosae, rosa
Rosae, rosae, rosas
Rosarum, rosis, rosis

Tango van de knappe floppen
Die met pukkels op hun koppen
Hun gebrek aan ziel verkroppen
Als de besten van de klas

Tango van de slappe Kezen
Die geen letter kunnen lezen
Maar straks dokter moeten wezen
Omdat papa dat nooit was

Tango die ik nimmer leerde
Daar ik toen al rebelleerde
En verbuigingen begeerde
Van mijn nichtje Rosa, Rosa!

Rosa, rosa, rosam
Rosae, rosae, rosa
Rosae, rosae, rosas
Rosarum, rosis, rosis

Tango van het zoete dwalen
Pink aan pink door liefdesdalen
Zo betrapte vele malen
Ons de zwartrok in het gras

Tango van de Natte Garde
Waar ik in de plassen staarde
En genadeloos ontwaarde
Dat ik geen Columbus was

Maar ook de tango van ’t plantsoen
Waar, in ’t rosarium in ’t groen
Mijn nichtje bij een korte zoen
Al bloosde als een Rosa, Rosa!

Rosa, rosa, rosam
Rosae, rosae, rosa
Rosae, rosae, rosas
Rosarum, rosis, rosis

Tango van het kantjeslopen
Tot ik nullen kreeg bij hopen
Die ik toen maar ging verkopen
Als aureolen voor Sint Jan

Tango van de hoogste prijzen
Voor de ijverigste wijzen
Propvol, op bepaalde wijze
Die geen mens gebruiken kan

En ook de tango van de spijt
Omdat een mens in later tijd
Ontdekt dat, in volwassenheid
Dat een rosa doornen dragen kan

Rosa, rosa, rosam
Rosae, rosae, rosa
Rosae, rosae, rosas
Rosarum, rosis, rosis

De Burgerij
Dronken, dol en dwaas
Beet ik in mijn bier
Bij de dikke Siaam uit Monverland
Ik dronk een glas met Klaas
Ik dronk een glas met Pier

En sprong er aardig uit de band
Die klaas hij voelde zich een Dante
Die Peer wou Casanova zijn
En ik de superarrogante
Ik dacht dat ik mezelf kon zijn

En om twaalf uur als de burgertroep
Huisging uit hotel de Goudfazant
Dan scholden wij ze poep
En zongen vol vuur pet in de hand

Burgerij, mannen van het jaar nul
Vette burgerkliek
Vette vieze varkens
Burgerij tamme zwijnenspul
Al die burger is is een ouwe

Dronken, dol en dwaas
Beet ik in mijn bier
Bij de dikke Siaam uit Monverland
Ik dronk een vat met Klaas

Ik dronk een fust met Pier
En sprong er heftig uit de band
Klaas Dante danste als mijn tante
En Casanova was te bang

Maar ik de superarrogante
Was zelfs voor mezelf niet bang
En om twaalf uur als de burgertroep
Huisging uit hotel de Goudfazant
Dan scholden wij ze poep
En zongen vol vuur pet in de hand

Burgerij, mannen van het jaar nul
Vette burgerkliek
Vette vieze varkens
Burgerij tamme zwijnenspul
Al die burger is is een ouwe

Elk instinct dwaas
Zoek ik mijn vertier
‘S Avonds in hotel de Goudfazant
Met meester-facteur Klaas
En met notaris Pier bespreek
Ik daar de avondkrant

En Klaas citeert eens wat uit Dante
Of Pier haalt Casanova aan
En ik ik bleef de superarrogante
Ik haal nog steeds mijn eigen woorden aan

Maar gaan wij naar huis meneer de brigadier
Dan staat daar bij die Siaam uit Monverland
Een hele troep gespuis
Dronken van al het bier dat zingt dan van

Burgerij, mannen van het jaar nul
Vette burgerkliek vette vieze varkens
Ja meneer de brigadier ja dat zingen ze
Burgerij tamme zwijnenspul
Al die burger is is een ouwe

Published on May 3, 2018 at 6:00 by

Taxes

I didn’t sleep well last night. Probably my menopausal thing. Oh well. I got out of bed half past ten. I baked two pancakes from the batter i made last Friday. With some bacon. Or whatever you call it. It was nice.

Today i had to fill in my taxes. One for everything i earned in 2017. Not that much. One for my VAT for the first quarter of 2018. Which i did first. With the camera, iPad and iMac i bought. So yes, hopefully i get it all back. After the VAT i went out and got some bread, peanut butter,chocolate, cats food and toilet paper. I bought a bread with a kroket and ae it in the Markthal and watched the people walking about and chatting and leading their lives. It brought tears to my eyes.

Well.

When i got back home i made some chocolate milk. I decided i would do a normal tax form. I’m not a company. I hardly earned anything last year anyway. So i did it the easy way. And yes, since i only made around 2000 euros last year, nothing i need to pay.

It is chilly today. Wet. But towards the end of the week it’ll warm up. Yeah.

*smile*

Published on May 1, 2018 at 6:00 by